Patients Want Video Radiology Reports

Patients Want Video Radiology Reports
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According a study recently published in the American Journal of Roentgenology, adding video into radiology reports improves patient engagement and help patients better understand their medical conditions.

 

Patient-centredness has become an increasingly important priority in healthcare, highlighting the significance of good patient communication. For radiologists, the radiology report is the primary method of communication to the patients. Previous research has shown patients prefer the easy access to their reports offered by digital portals and that 76% of patients have active online access. However, the reports’ technical language may present a barrier to understanding for some patients.

 

With the aim of addressing this gap, lead researcher Dr Michael P. Recht at New York University and colleagues produced patient-centred video radiology reports with lay language and annotated images to explain results. They wanted to see if the reports had any effect on patient experience and understanding of imaging results and if receiving such reports improved the patient’s experience and understanding.

 

Visage Imaging GmbH collaborated with the researchers to build an integrated video reporting tool inside the diagnostic viewer, allowing for both image and voice capture. To help patients better understand the radiological images, rendered images were automatically created which were immediately available at the workstation for incorporation into video reporting. These radiology reports were then uploaded to the health portal with the clinical notes and examination images. To assess their perception of the video reports and request feedback, a 10-question survey was given to the patients.

 

From 20 September 2021 to 22 January 2022, 105 out of 227 faculty radiologists created a total of 3,763 video radiology reports, with patients viewing 864 unique videos., patients highly rated their overall experience with video radiology reports (4.7 out of 5.0) based on 101 survey respondents. Patients indicated that the lay language and annotated images in the video radiology reports helped improve patients’ understanding of their results.

 

‘Patient-centred video radiology reports are a useful tool to help improve patient understanding of imaging results,’ explained Dr Recht. ‘The mechanism of creating the video reports and delivering them to patients can be integrated into existing informatics infrastructure.’

 

Source: ARRS, American Journal of Roentgenology

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Published on : Sun, 24 Apr 2022



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Telehealth, Radiology reports, Patient Access, lay language, plain language According a study recently published in the American Journal of Roentgenology, adding video into radiology reports improves patient engagement and help patients better understand their medical conditions.

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