The Lower Your Status, The Higher Your Risk of High Blood Pressure

Social status is related to risk of high blood pressure, according to researchers from the Medical University of Vienna. Anita Rieder and Thomas Dorner from the Institute of Social Medicine in Vienna analysed international and national data on the  socio-demographic aspects of hypertension. They found that variables such as education, income, employment, professional status and migration background increase the risk of developing high blood pressure. They also found that existing hypertension in people with these risk factors is harder to control, and target levels are achieved less often. Age, even though it increases the risk of hypertension overall, does not play a role.

Dorner explains that one cause is "gratification crisis", which is when the reward is not regarded as equal to effort expended.  Effort includes dedication, knowledge, time and personal skills while  reward is not just monetary compensation, but also job security, job opportunities or influence. 

Rieder notes that people of higher social status (higher income and higher education level) tend to live healthier lifestyles, have health insurance and access health services such as screening. 

Source: Medical University of Vienna

Published on : Wed, 14 May 2014


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Research, high blood pressure, blood pressure, lifestyle, hypertension Social status is related to risk of high blood pressure, according to researchers from the Medical University of Vienna. Anita Rieder and Thomas Dorner fro

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