Applications now invited for the BIR/GE Radiation Safety Travel Award

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£1,000 funding offered for award designed to promote worldwide innovation in radiation safety.

 

The BIR/GE Radiation Safety Travel award aims to share best practice in radiation safety. Participants are asked to design a new tool or resource to improve radiation safety in healthcare. This could be innovative software or a novel use of new technologies. It might be a device or object to warn, protect or assess protection provided.

 

The winner of the award, which is kindly supported by GE Healthcare, receives a £1,000 bursary  to travel to a relevant scientific conference of their choice to present the innovation

 

Applicants must complete the form at www.bir.org.uk/radiationsafetyaward, giving details of the resource or tool in less than 500 words, and return to [email protected]. Closing date for applications is 31 March 2019.

 

The award is made every two years and applications will be judged by the BIR Awards and Prizes committee. GE Healthcare will not be part of the decision making process. Results will be announced by 30 April 2019 and the award will be presented at a BIR event later in the year.

 

Peter Hiles, Chair of the BIR Radiation Safety Special Interest Group, said “This award not only inspires innovation in radiation safety but also encourages professional development and good practice. We thank GE Healthcare for supporting this initiative.”

Karl Blight, General Manager Northern Europe, GE Healthcare, said “GE Healthcare is delighted to support this award, which promotes worldwide best practice in radiation safety and allows talent and innovation to be shared in the wider arena.”

About radiation safety
Ionising radiation can increase the risk of cancer. High doses can cause serious damage, including radiation burns. 
However, while it may sound dangerous, the radiation used in medicine is closely controlled, and the risk of any problems resulting from exposure to radiation is very small.
Examples of using ionising radiation to treat or diagnose a condition include:
  • tests such as X-rays and CT scans – a low level of ionising radiation is used to produce images of the inside of the body
  • nuclear medicine – for example, a mild radioactive substance can be injected into the bloodstream so it shows up better on an imaging scan
  • radiotherapy – a common cancer treatment that uses ionising radiation to kill cancerous cells
 
About The British Institute of Radiology
 

The British Institute of Radiology is an international membership organisation for everyone working in imaging, radiation oncology and the underlying sciences.

 

Our aims are to:

               support the work of our members and their colleagues to achieve professional excellence

               provide continuing professional development for our multidisciplinary community

               publish  cutting edge research for our authors and readers across the world

               influence and connect with the wider professional sector.

 
About GE Healthcare

 

GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services that are shaping a new age of patient care. Our expertise in medical imaging and information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, performance improvement, drug discovery, and biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies is helping clinicians around the world re-imagine new ways to predict, diagnose, inform, treat and monitor disease, so patients can live their lives to the fullest.

 

Published on : Tue, 16 Oct 2018



Healthcare, Radiation safety, BIR/GE Radiation Safety Travel Award, innovation in radiation safety The BIR/GE Radiation Safety Travel award aims to share best practice in radiation safety. Participants are asked to design a new tool or resource to improve radiation safety in healthcare. This could be innovative software or a novel use of new technologi

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