A new study shows that point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) assessment of distal forearm injuries in children is accurate, timely and is associated with low levels of pain and high satisfaction. Findings of the study are published in Academic Emergency Medicine.

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When it comes to the management of suspected arm fractures in children, the most important goals include fast and accurate diagnosis, minimum pain and limited exposure to radiation. By achieving these goals, there is a greater chance of achieving higher caregiver satisfaction. Findings from this study suggest that POCUS could be a viable alternative to x-ray in terms of accuracy, cost-effectiveness, pain, satisfaction and procedure duration.

The study was conducted with children aged 4-17 years with suspected non-angulated distal forearm fractures. Study researchers investigated the test performance characteristics and patient outcomes of POCUS as compared to x-ray. Out of 169 children, 76 had fractures. POCUS had greater sensitivity at 94.7% and greater specificity at 93.5%. It was also associated with higher caregiver satisfaction and lower pain score and procedure duration as compared to x-ray.

Lead author Naveen Poonai, MD, MSc MD FRCPC, associate professor paediatrics and internal Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry at Western University says that these findings suggest that POCUS is an accurate tool for the diagnosis of distal forearm fractures in children and has lower pain levels and higher satisfaction.

Source: Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
Image Credit: Dialysis Technician Salary

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point-of-care ultrasound, POCUS, x-ray, distal forearm injuries A new study shows that point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) assessment of distal forearm injuries in children is accurate, timely and is associated with low levels of pain and high satisfaction. Findings of the study are published in Academic Emergency Medici