The American College of Radiology (ACR) have released new breast cancer screening guidelines, recommending earlier and more intensive screening for women at high-risk.

 

The latest scientific evidence states that all women at higher-than-average risk should undergo risk assessment by age 25 to determine if MRI surveillance is required earlier than their 40s.

 

It is understood that multiple risk factors increase risk for breast cancer, including genetic mutations, family history, chest radiation at young age, personal history of breast cancer or high-risk lesions, breast density, and race/ethnicity.

 

ACR stressed the need for more intensive-screening among Black women and those of Ashkenazi Jewish decent, who may have increased risk of developing the disease.

 

Debra Monticciolo, MD, FACR, primary author of the new guidelines, said, “The latest scientific evidence continues to point to earlier assessment as well as augmented and earlier-than-age-40 screening of many women — particularly Black women and other minority women”.

 

ACR stressed that women with a calculated life-time risk of breast cancer of 20% or more, or who have a genetic-based predisposition should undergo MRI surveillance at ages 25-30, as they are considered high-risk. 

 

If women have a personal history of breast cancer and dense tissue, or diagnosed with breast cancer before age 50, they should have annual supplemental breast MRI. If they cannot undergo MRI screening it is recommended that they consider contrast-enhance mammography or ultrasound.

ACR notes that all women should undergo risk assessment by age 25, which will allow for planning of appropriate supplemental screening. This is especially vital for black women, those of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and other minority women, who are at higher risk of genetic mutations or of developing breast cancer at younger ages.

 

Source: American College of Radiology

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References:

Debra Monticciolo et al. (2023) Breast Cancer Screening for Women at Higher-than-Average Risk: Updated Recommendations from the ACR. Journal of the American College of Radiology. 




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ACR, Breast Cancer, Screening The American College of Radiology (ACR) have released new breast cancer screening guidelines, recommending earlier and more intensive screening for women...