New Portable Device to Monitor Breast Cancer Wins James Dyson Award

New Portable Device to Monitor Breast Cancer Wins James Dyson Award
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Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the U.K. The earlier breast cancer is detected, the easier it is to manage, and the more successful the treatment.

 

It is important to regularly self-check all over the breast for abnormalities, including around the armpit areas and up to the collarbone. However, self-regulation is not frequently carried out by many women. Fortunately, postgraduate students at the Royal College of Art are set to change this habit with a new device which helps women check their breasts more regularly.

 

The Dotplot, a portable tool created to monitor breast health, has won the prestigious U.K. James Dyson Award. The aim of the device is to eliminate any misconceptions surrounding breast check-ups and increase self-examinations. This new device can be used at home and helps flag abnormalities as soon as possible. The app creates a report at the end of each check, allowing users to track their changes by comparing statistics from previous months.

 

Once a month, they are required to input their breast size and shape into the app and press the device over their chest for the device to build a personalised map of their torso.

Instructions are included to prompt women to follow the on-screen marker, informing them where to move the device to take a reading of a specific location.

 

Soundwaves are used to record tissue composition. The tool examines any changes in the density, and if any abnormalities appear, service users are notified and advised to visit a healthcare professional.

 

It is worth noting that this device does not diagnose anything. Rather, it simply alerts the service user about any suspicious changes.

 

Debra Babalola and Shefali Bohra, co-founders of Dotplot, champion its advantages and hope it will facilitate diagnosis while empowering women to be confident in routine self-checks.

 

Ms Bohra commented, “We realised that women are looking for a way that not only tells them what has to be done but also teaches them how and why breast self-checks are supposed to be conducted.”

 

The goal of Dotplot is not to substitute medical professionals. Instead, it encourages women to make a habit of examining their breasts so that any abnormalities can be medically examined as soon as possible.

 

Source: BBC News

 

Image Credit: iStock

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Published on : Fri, 9 Sep 2022



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breast cancer, The Dotplot, portable tool Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the U.K. The earlier breast cancer is detected, the easier it is to manage, and the more successful the treatment.

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