Continuous Monitoring Saves $15 billion?

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Tools that provide continuous monitoring have the potential to save hospitals $20,000 per bed annually, a report says.
Researchers from Harvard have projected that contact-free continuous monitoring platforms have the potential to save the healthcare industry as much as $15 billion per annum.
According to a new peer-reviewed paper published in Critical Care Medicine.
Contact-free continuous monitoring  (CFCM) is a platform means of tapping into sensors to measure patients’ vital signs and other metrics.
CFCM is used to monitor metrics such as heartbeat, respiratory rate, ulcers and patient motion. Sensors are placed under a patient's mattress or in a chair, bedside monitor and other components of the technology comprise a central display station and handheld devices.
The sensors measure heartbeats per minute and breaths per minute and detects any changes from regular patterns. If a patient's status changes, nursing staff are alerted via large screens set up in prime locations, as well as by handheld devices.
Clinical outcome improvements are the source of cost savings according to the report that has referred to hospitals already implementing CFCM. The data can help in reducing patient length of stay, minimise use of intensive care units, reduce falls and pressure ulcers and avoid cardiac and respiratory arrests.
The $15 billion figure was arrived at by projection savings to the 750,000 beds in the U.S. hospital system. However, the projections do not include those patients in beds outside the hospital setting.
The technology also holds the promise of reducing patient falls, cut ICU days and avoid 208,000 deaths.

Source: Healthcare IT News
Image Credit: Medical Daily

Published on : Wed, 10 Aug 2016


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