Novel therapy for treating cardiogenic shock

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A new study aims to assess the effectiveness of a novel therapy for treating cardiogenic shock and patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous intervention procedures.

The Synchritude Registry is a prospective, nonrandomised, multicentre, open-label registry of the performance of the i-cor Synchronised Cardiac Assist device to be conducted at 30 centres encompassing 300 patients with cardiogenic shock or those undergoing high-risk percutaneous intervention procedures in the cardiac catheterisation lab. The i-cor system is manufactured by Xenios AG.

Professor Dr. Tienush Rassaf, the principal investigator, and his team at Westdeutsches Herz- & Gefäßzentrum, Essen performed the procedures with the i-cor system on the first patients enrolled in the study.

"A promising novel technology has been developed to address the unmet need of cardiogenic shock treatment in a physiological way. We are much eager to enrol a reasonable number of patients to gain further experience with the i-cor therapy," according to Prof. Rassaf.

The i-cor Synchronised Cardiac Assist is a small extracorporeal pump that is synchronised to the heartbeat so that augmentation of cardiac output with well-oxygenated blood occurs during diastole and does not represent an increased afterload on the heart during systole. The technology designed to offer physiological circulatory support is expected to increase cardiac output, stabilise the vital signs and reduce the manifestations of cardiogenic shock. In those patients receiving the i-cor therapy during high-risk PCI procedures, it is expected that myocardial tissue will be preserved and cardiac function protected by the device.

The research team said the i-cor therapy shows tremendous promise in reaching this clinical objective – first-in-human use of the device was safe and feasible.

According to Jürgen Böhm, CEO of Xenios AG, the i-cor system enables a whole new chapter in cardiac support. The i-cor system is the only commercially available device to synchronise mechanical circulatory support with the heartbeat.

"This innovation not only opens new therapy options for patients who are suffering from cardiogenic shock, but also serves to bridge patients across high-risk interventions in the cardiac cath lab," Böhm added.

Source: PCRonline
Image Credit: Xenios

Published on : Wed, 1 Nov 2017


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cardiogenic shock, percutaneous intervention, cardiac catheterisation lab A new study aims to assess the effectiveness of a novel therapy for treating cardiogenic shock and patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous intervention procedures.

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