Coping with Pre-Hospital Stroke Symptoms

Strokes are a major cause of death and long-term disability globally, including in developing countries. In China, strokes are also the leading cause of morbidity and mortality, with prevalence rates having risen sharply over the past decade. Several studies have shown that the capacity to identify stroke signs, knowle

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LDL-C Associated With Narrowing Of Aortic Valve

According to a new study published in JAMA, genetic predisposition to elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with narrowing of the aortic valve. The study was conducted with 35,000 participants and the findings show a causal association between LDL-C and aortic valve disease. The findings of

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Accreditation: A Common Quality-Enhancing Strategy

As many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) pursue healthcare reforms in order to achieve universal health coverage (UHC), the development of national accreditation systems has become an increasingly common quality-enhancing strategy endorsed by payers, including Ministries of Health. For example, the Joint L

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Hospital 'For-Profit' Conversion: No Impact on Quality of Care

US hospitals that converted from nonprofit to for-profit status in the 2000s subsequently enjoyed better financial health, but their conversion made no difference in the quality of care provided or mortality rates, according to researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. Their study examined chara

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Dramatic Decline in ARDS Mortality Rates

According to the largest study to date of mortality trends in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), advances in critical care medicine played a major role in reducing the rate of mortality over a sixteen year period. The study has been published in the journal CHEST and will be presented at Chest 20

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ESICM 2014: Access to Acute Care - Planning Needed Now for Cities

More than half of the world’s population already live in cities, and the the proportion is predicted to grow to 70% by 2050. Infrastructure planning is essential for cities to manage this growth. However, access to information that can assist cities to plan healthcare is not uniformly available across high-, middle-

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Possible Therapeutic Solution To Inhibit Obesity Gene

Scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have identified several potent inhibitors that selectively target FTO, the fat mass and obesity-associated gene. The FTO-specific inhibitors could pave the way for the development of anti-obesity drugs and could provide individuals who are genetically pred

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Simulations Show How Bacteria Resist Antiobiotics

Research scientists at the University of Bristol have used computer simulations to show how bacteria destroy antibiotics. This could be a major breakthrough and could help in the development of drugs that can effectively tackle bacterial infections in the future. The research team focused on the role of enzym

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Real World Data Critical For Healthcare

A session at the European Health Forum 2014 put forward examples of best practices from projects and live implementation that are improving the way real world data can be used to improve healthcare. Clinical trial protocols often exclude relevant groups when evaluating medicines. They sometimes also fail to consider h

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Training Competent Public Health Informaticians

The primary focus of public health is prevention, with a key focus on responding to the health needs of individuals as well as populations. Meanwhile, public health informatics (PHI) is the field in which today’s information revolution meets the specific needs of public health. It is also defined as information, comp

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Insulin-Control Cells Produced in Laboratory

A team at Harvard University has used stem cells to produce hundreds of millions of cells in the laboratory that control blood sugar levels. These are the beta cells in the pancreas that pump out insulin to control blood sugar levels. In people suffering from Type 1 Diabetes, the immune system starts to destroy these c

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Blood Test Could Help Diagnose Schizophrenia

According to a new study, a blood test could determine who is at high risk for developing schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis. The research, conducted by Dr. Diana O. Perkins of the University of North Carolina and her research team, has been published in Schizophrenia Bulletin.Schizophrenia affects around 24 mi

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MIR 2014: Social Media Brings Visibility

The irony of being without wifi while talking about social media was not lost on delegates to the Management in Radiology (MIR) Annual Scientific Meeting in Bologna this month. However, the temporary glitch did not detract from an informative session on the dos, don’ts and possibilities of social media. Social media

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MIR 2014: Calling In Critical Findings

The importance of communicating critical and incidental findings as soon as possible is not in dispute. The radiologist’s responsibility does not end with the report, and he/she has a duty to communicate findings to referring clinicians. As it is, failure to communicate appropriately is the second most common reason

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